Here are the highlights we took (quickly) from this afternoon’s Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate for the American Health Care Act.

The AHCA “would reduce federal deficits by $337 billion over the 2017-2026 period.”

In 2018, “14 million more people would be uninsured under the [AHCA] than under current law. Most of that increase would

Screenplays, new business ventures and major legislation typically have problems in Act II.  Hopes were raised so high in Act I.  Now, things seem to drag on and on, pointlessly.   Friends tell you to give up or start over and enemies . . . well.

Last week, two House committees – Energy and Commerce,

During the week reviewed, no new bill was introduced which, if passed, would repeal or replace the Affordable Care Act, and little else happened at the three main ACA enforcement agencies – DOL, HHS and IRS.

Department of Labor

The Department of Labor still has no Secretary and the nominee, Andrew Puzder, has not yet

Nothing resembling a repeal/replace consensus bill emerged from any committee in either chamber during the survey period.  Instead, in a Fox News interview broadcast just before the Super Bowl, the President confessed that ACA repeal may require more than a year.  A concise summary by Peter Sullivan in The Hill is online here.

Consistent

As previously reported, § 2001 of the 2017 budget bill required all ACA repeal/replace bills to be filed and reported from assigned committees by Friday, January 27, 2017.  That didn’t happen.  Since our last posting, the bills listed below have been filed and assigned to committees, but no ACA bill has emerged from committee in

On January 13, the House passed the 2017 budget resolution (S. Con. Res. 3), which should be found on President Trump’s desk Monday morning.  As previously explained, this sets the stage for a filibuster-proof, budget reconciliation bill that can repeal and replace spending and tax provisions of the ACA.

S. 106,  introduced

On January 5, the House passed the “Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act of 2017” (H.R. 26), streamlining the process for Congressional review and rejection of administrative agency rules, including a 10-year sunset provision for rules that Congress has not expressly approved.

In a late night “vote-a-rama” held January 11-12,

We didn’t take ten weeks off because there was nothing to talk about.  Rather, we concluded around Labor Day that anything useful to be said about ACA compliance, pre-election, would be interpreted as political advocacy, so we decided to watch and wait.  The anti-ACA candidate won, and his party carried Congress, too.  That settles that,

In the ACA realm, change is the only constant, so don’t take this to the bank.  We’re telling you what we see for the first time, on a first reading of the draft 2016 Forms and Instructions that the IRS has released since July 7.  “Applicable Large Employers,” their contractors and consultants will use these

In Central United Life Ins. Co. v. Burwell, D.C. Cir. No. 15-5310 (July 1, 2016), a D.C. Circuit panel affirmed, 3-0, a trial court injunction barring enforcement of the 2014 HHS regulation permitting individual fixed-indemnity policies to be sold only as supplements to ACA minimum essential coverage. You’ve heard this theme before. The Public