Nearly three years ago, having spent hundreds of hours immersed in ACA minutiae, we anticipated that clients would not react well to fees for services that consisted principally of telling them that they had asked the wrong question. So we decided, against tradition and much conventional wisdom, to sink lots of unpaid partner time into this education project. A casual reader of this blog should learn basic ACA terms and concepts, so that he or she can converse effectively with advisors. A regular reader should be able to identify, during such a conversation, a purported ACA expert who’s a poseur. Sadly, they abound. A colleague should find this a thought-provoking reference to ACA rules and guidance documents. Those are our goals.

Substitute nothing you read here for legal or other professional advice about any specific situation. ACA rules and sub-regulatory guidance change frequently and whimsically. Occasionally, the three main enforcement agencies (DOL, HHS, IRS) disagree. Sometimes, they publish a new rule unaware of a related, existing rule. Part of our service to you is to alert you to what we see coming. We usually have guessed right, but we often are guessing. And of course, apparently insignificant factual details can turn out to be determinative. If you regard this blog as cheap – i.e., free – legal advice, you’re rolling the dice at your own risk and the risk might be far bigger than you realize.

Finally, we invite constructive comments, including reasoned criticism, but not rants. We delete hissy-fits and block commenters who seem to be unable to comment otherwise. That goes triple for political hyperbole. Sometimes, we must explain political realities in order to explain a regulatory reality, but we try to be objective. You should, too.